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title:“Alexander Hamilton: On the Constitutionality of a National Bank”
authors:Alexander Hamilton
date written:1791-2-23

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https://consource.org/document/alexander-hamilton-on-the-constitutionality-of-a-national-bank-1791-2-23/20130122080110/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:01 a.m. UTC
retrieved:July 4, 2020, 12:05 p.m. UTC

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citation:
Hamilton, Alexander. "Alexander Hamilton: On the Constitutionality of a National Bank." The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. Vol. 3. Ed. Max Farrand. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1911. Print.

Alexander Hamilton: On the Constitutionality of a National Bank (February 23, 1791)

February 23, 1791.
Another argument made use of by the Secretary of State is, the rejection of a proposition by the Convention to empower Congress to make corporations, either generally, or for some special purpose.
What was the precise nature or extent of this proposition, or what the reasons for refusing it, is not ascertained by any authentic document, or even by accurate recollection. As far as any such document exists, it specifies only canals. If this was the amount of it, it would, at most, only prove that it was thought inexpedient to give a power to incorporate for the purpose of opening canals, for which purpose a special power would have been necessary, except with regard to the western territory, there being nothing in any part of the Constitution respecting the regulation of canals. It must be confessed, however, that very different accounts are given the import of the proposition, and of the motives for rejecting it. Some affirm that it was confined to the opening of canals and obstructions in rivers; others, that it embraced banks; and others, that it extended to the power of incorporating generally. Some, again, allege that it was disagreed to because it was thought improper to vest in Congress a power of erecting corporations. Others, because it was thought unnecessary to specify the power, and inexpedient to furnish an additional topic of objection to the Constitution. In this state of the matter, no inference whatever can be drawn from it.

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