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title:“Caleb Strong in the Massachusetts Convention”
authors:Caleb Strong
date written:1788-1-15

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https://consource.org/document/caleb-strong-in-the-massachusetts-convention-1788-1-15/20130122081630/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:16 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Sept. 19, 2019, 4:27 a.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
Strong, Caleb. "Caleb Strong in the Massachusetts Convention." The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. Vol. 3. Ed. Max Farrand. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1911. Print.

Caleb Strong in the Massachusetts Convention (January 15, 1788)

January 15, 1788.
The Hon. Mr. Strong rose to reply to the inquiry of the Hon. Mr. Adams, why the alteration of elections from annual to biennial was made, and to correct an inaccuracy of the Hon. Mr. Gorham, who, the day before, had said that that alteration was made to gratify South Carolina. He said he should then have arisen to put his worthy colleague right; but his memory was not sufficiently retentive to enable him immediately to collect every circumstance. He had since recurred to the original plan. When the subject was at first discussed in convention, some gentlemen were for having the term extended to a considerable length of time; others were opposed to it, as it was contrary to the ideas and customs of the Eastern States; but a majority were in favor of three years, and it was, he said, urged by the Southern States, which are not so populous as the Eastern, that the expense of more frequent elections would be great. He concluded by saying that a general concession produced the term as it stood in the section, although it was agreeable to the practice of South Carolina. [From "Debates of Convention"]
Caleb Strong. Stated the grounds proceeded on in Federal Convention; determined at first to be triennial; afterwards reduced to biennial; South Carolina having at home biennial elections, and it was a compromise. [From "Parson's Minutes"]

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