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title:“Extract of a Letter from Rhode-Island”
authors:Anonymous
date written:1789-11-21

permanent link
to this version:
https://consource.org/document/extract-of-a-letter-from-rhode-island-1789-11-21/20130122084115/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:41 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Sept. 17, 2019, 10:58 p.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
"Extract of a Letter from Rhode-Island." Pennsylvania Gazette 1789-11-21 : . Rpt. in The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution. Vol. 14. Ed. Gaspare J. Saladino and John P. Kaminski. Madison: Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 1983. 164. Print.
manuscript
source:
Manuscripts Division, Library of Congress

Extract of a Letter from Rhode-Island (November 21, 1789)

"By the papers now forwarded, you may form some idea of the politics of this state. From the proceedings of our Legislature last week, you may reasonably conclude that our rulers have not yet compleated their diabolical Schemes. How far they mean to carry their vile plans, time alone must make known. A viler and more abandoned sett of beings never disgraced any Legislative, Judicial or Executive Authorities since the Fall of Adam. Every conscientious and honest man in our devoted republic is employed in contemplating with admiration, and devoutly wishing for the speedy adoption of the NEW CONSTITUTION, tho' their fears are occasionally on the alarm from the ill-founded suggestions of a G-r-y, and the more sly insinuations of your SIXTEEN seceding members; performances too well adapted to blow up the flame of disunion, and to imbitter the minds of the people against all good and virtuous government. [Such men, I am sorry to find, you have in Pennsylvania. Were we favored with a civil constitution immediately from Heaven, I have no doubt but that THEY, with our abandoned leaders, would enter their objections.] God grant that there may be wisdom and goodness enough still found among the majority to adopt, without hesitation, what a WASHINGTON, a FRANKLIN, a MADISON, &c. so warmly recommend. Without this adoption, a civil war, I am afraid, will take place. This must arise from the present confusion of our different state governments.-1The proceedings of the Baptist Association, lately convened at New-York, are highly approved here. Their brethren throughout the eastern states are also highly federal. Mayall other Christian denominations evidence the same zeal, in cordially recommending and fervently espousing a firm, vigorous and well-established government, so admirably calculated for the preservation of our dear-bought liberty, CIVIL and RELIGIOUS."2

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1789-11-21

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