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title:“James Wilsons' Notes of the Pennsylvania Ratification Convention”
authors:Anonymous
date written:1787-12-11

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https://consource.org/document/james-wilsons-notes-of-the-pennsylvania-ratification-convention-1787-12-11-2/20130122082710/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:27 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Jan. 17, 2021, 9:04 a.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
"James Wilsons' Notes of the Pennsylvania Ratification Convention." The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution. Vol. 2. Ed. Gaspare J. Saladino and John P. Kaminski. Madison: Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 1976. 551-52. Print.

James Wilsons' Notes of the Pennsylvania Ratification Convention (December 11, 1787)

JAMES WILSON: 2d List of Objections The Convention, no doubt, thought they were forming a compactor contract of the greatest importance (No. 184).
The present Confederation should have been continued; but additional powers should have been given (Page 5, 6, 16, No. 4, 7, 79, 149, 152). The extent of the government is too great. It cannot be executed (No. 157). The general government ought not to possess power for internal purposes (No. 56, 57, 79, 95, 186). There is no sovereignty left in the state governments (No. 60). This is a consolidating government; and will abolish the state governments (No. 71, 72, 114, 157, 162, 221, 222, 223, 224).
The powers of the several parts of this government are not kept distinct and independent (No. 46, 54, 67, 160). The number of Representatives is too small (No. 36, 37, 38, 116), and may be made smaller (No. 76). The districts will be too great (No. 37, 83, 116). They may be bribed by the Senate (39, 40, 68, 69, 120). The powers of the Senate are too great (No. 17, 41, 66, 122, 156, 158, 159, 175, 192), and representation unequal1 (No. 75). The Senate may be bribed (No. 43).
The power of internal taxation ought not to be given (No. 59, 135). The power over elections is dangerous (No. 119, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147).
The President is only a tool of the Senate (No. 120, 122, 158). He should have had the appointment of all officers with the advice of a council (No. 121)
2
The judges are not sufficiently independent (No. 47, 92). Their powers are too extensive (No. 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 177, 178, 181, 182). They may hold sinecures (No. 191, 195).

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1787-12-11

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