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Source & Citation Info

title:“Newspaper Report 3 of Pennsylvania Convention Proceedings”
authors:Anonymous
date written:1787-11-27

permanent link
to this version:
https://consource.org/document/newspaper-report-3-of-pennsylvania-convention-proceedings-1787-11-27/20130122075913/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 7:59 a.m. UTC
retrieved:June 3, 2020, 8:51 a.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
"Newspaper Report 3 of Pennsylvania Convention Proceedings." The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution. Vol. 2. Ed. Gaspare J. Saladino and John P. Kaminski. Madison: Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 1976. 380. Print.

Newspaper Report 3 of Pennsylvania Convention Proceedings (November 27, 1787)

THOMAS MCKEAN: On motion to read the first Article of the proposed Constitution for debate, the question was put and carried. The Article being read, Thomas M'Kean said, I rise to request that a spirit of conciliation and coolness may prevail in this discussion. The wisest and best men in all countries and ages have differed on the subject of government. The history of ancient government is some-what obscure; yet enough has been given us to authorize the conclusion, than no two of them were alike. Though China and Sweden are despotic governments, they are widely different. The monarchies of France and Spain meet in very few points; nor are there any two republics but differ in their forms and powers of government. They all descend from the same parent (the People) but they are of various features and complexions. Even in religion we disagree to confine ourselves to one sect-how various are the doctrines, church discipline, and worship of Christians-though have but one rule, the New Testament the new Constitution (if you please). And if men think so differently on the most important subject which can interest society, how silly, how extremely narrow is it, that we should quarrel, because we cannot altogether agree on the subject before us. I hope our inquiries will have information for their object, and that our debates will be conducted with decency and the utmost moderation.
1
This speech must be admired by every friend to order and dis- passionate reasoning and will no doubt greatly influence the deliberations of the Convention.

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