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title:“Rufus King to Theodore Sedgwick”
authors:Rufus King
date written:1787-6-10

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to this version:
https://consource.org/document/rufus-king-to-theodore-sedgwick-1787-6-10/20130122084507/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:45 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Dec. 1, 2022, 12:17 a.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
King, Rufus. "Letter to Theodore Sedgwick." Supplement to Max Farrand's The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. Ed. James H. Hutson. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987. 67-68. Print.
manuscript
source:
Autograph Letter Signed, Massachusetts Historical Society

Rufus King to Theodore Sedgwick (June 10, 1787)

Philadelphia, 10 June 1787.
I am happy my Dear Friend that you are a member of the Legislature for the present year; and cannot but flatter myself that you will have so respectable a number of your own sentiments that you will be able to check the madness of Democracy, and hold the political ship at least where she is, if you shall not be able to manage her agreeably to your own just opinions. Moderation and firmness will be essential in your measures; I wish you may have as good a proportion of these excellent qualities as truly characterise our convention. I know you are anxious, in common with the virtuous and reflecting characters of every State, to be informed of the Disposition and projects which have shown themselves in the Convention. Be a little patient; I think there is some foundation to hope for Good. I am precluded from communicating, even confidentially, any particulars of the proceedings. However I shall ask your opinion by an early post on some points of consequence, which must receive a Discussion in the Convention; the Question must be made to you in confidence, and may serve to give you some Idea of what will be contended for by a respectable number of political characters. Farewel-Remember that the character, nay the most important Interest of Mass. is concerned in their sending men of consequence, and not Dunces to Congress. Probably the most important considerations may be under the deliberation of the next Congress-the public Debt, the claim of the several states, and a number of other Objects equally interesting and consequential:-
Once more, Farewel, R. King I am very much pleased with Mr. Strong his mind is what it should be.

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