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Source & Citation Info

title:“William Ellery to Benjamin Huntington”
authors:William Ellery
date written:1789-4-25

permanent link
to this version:
https://consource.org/document/william-ellery-to-benjamin-huntington-1789-4-25/20130122083346/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:33 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Nov. 19, 2019, 2:45 a.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
Ellery, William. "Letter to Benjamin Huntington." Creating the Bill of Rights. Ed. Kenneth R. Bowling and Helen E. Veit. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. 232. Print.
manuscript
source:
Rhode Island State Archives

William Ellery to Benjamin Huntington (April 25, 1789)

I don't hear a word about amendments. Money is indeed the first and most important object. Neither civil nor military wheels can turn easily without it. But it had seemed to me that the Delegates from those States which had ordered them to move and urge amendments, would have started them as soon as a Congress was formed. I am glad that a matter of much greater consequence has been brought upon the tapis; and perhaps it would not be amiss to try whether the new government would not do without any alteration.
It is probable whenever amendments are proposed some degree of ill humour may take place of that harmony which I am told, prevails, and I hope will prevail in Congress.

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